Tumbly goodness, page 13 Atom feed

Kottke says a tumblelog is a quick and dirty stream of consciousness… with more than just links. Anarchaia was the first, but there are many copies. And they have a plan.

  1. I love platypope’s footnotes.

  2. If Congress got rid of online gambling, how come the biggest online bet is whether voters will get rid of Congress?

    Bruce Reed, via MR

  3. Bryan Caplan asks libertarians, what currently illegal thing do you personally really want to be free to do?

  4. Erin’s FSM pumpkin

    Vote for Erin’s FSM pumpkin (#12)!

  5. Schneier needs to read some Brin.

  6. With the Sox’s baseball season being over, The Soxaholix have to find other targets for their biting wit. It just so happens that they’ve recently brought up both of the TV shows that Erin and I watch: Lost and Battlestar Galactica.

    On Lost: Meanwhile, I guess we now know why in two wars we never once heard any mention of the Iraqi navy.

    On BSG: I’m talking about how ChipSix has gone from the being the sexiest woman in all of made-for-TV scifi evah to being at times downright scary in season 3… I mean scary as in she’s caught a wicked case of the fug. Which, being that she is Cylon, shouldn’t be happening. It’s ruining the entire story arc fantasy for me.

  7. This is too good (and short) not to quote in its entirety. Tim Bray on different strategies for making your blog faster:

    Don Park makes his blog go fast by applying WhirlyCache to the DAO layer, slipping in a transaction layer to reduce database integrity corruption, and using aspect-oriented programming technology via the Spring framework, with the help of Java annotations to mark transactional methods and classes. Yow! My approach is to have Apache serve static data out of the filesystem. Whatever; faster is better.

    My approach definitely tends toward the serve-static-files-with-Apache end of the spectrum.

  8. Peter Saint-Andre was in town for a conference this week, so we met — for the first time, though we’ve known each other online for several years now — for dinner Wednesday night. Of course, I took him to Mamá Testa, for the best tacos San Diego has to offer.

  9. IE 7 launched last night, and someone’s already found a vulnerability. Awesome, just awesome.

  10. I’ve gotten about a dozen calls from 866-838-6579 in the last few days. Thanks to whocalled.us, I’ve learned that my bank is annoying lots of people with this.

  11. Before After

    Left: A photo I took at Erin’s folks’ house a while ago.

    Right: What gadl was able to do with it.

  12. Wow. Eventful needs one of these:

    The Bell

    “This is a project from May of 2004. It’s a simple parallel port hack to interface with a mechanical bell. The bell happens to be hooked up to the software deployment mechanism at work.”

  13. The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences, entry A104101: The Lost Numbers.

  14. I wonder what Ask a Ninja would have to say about nunjas.

  15. The bottom line: The poor in the United States have about the same real income as the poor in western Europe. The rich in the United States, however, are much richer.Greg Mankiw

  16. Sweet. Kyle is Blogging the Federalist.

  17. From The Futility of Designing for an Alternate Past:

    While it’s great to draw inspiration and ideas from the past, recreating the past in the hope that it becomes the future seems like a futile idea.

  18. Highway to Jian Feng Shan

    The highway to Jian Feng Shan, near Jinhua, China, where serapio is living these days.

  19. Jon Hicks posted some awesome CSS for styling microformatted data.

    I’m trying out his technique here. For example, here’s the paragraph about WordCamp from this post:

    WordCamp as styled hCalendar

    I had to explicitly disable the styling of hCards within hCalendars. In the above WordCamp hCalendar, the link to Brad is actually an hCard, and so the box around Brad was interfering with the box around the WordCamp hCalendar. Chris Casciano’s observed the same problem. With the nesting fix, things look awesome again.

  20. Rakesh Agrawal posted his notes from a talk that Carl Sjogreen gave about how his team went about building Google Calendar. Some choice bits:

    • First thing’s first — go talk to "real" customers
    • sounds cliche but it’s amazing how little it’s really done
    • focused on getting interactions and user model right before thinking about scale (a significant challenge for us)
    • Save the pixel pushing (fine alignment on the user interface) for when you know you have it right
    • Always have an eye on the minimum useful feature set that most people will use
    • focus on what the web can do that paper can’t
    • Timing launch properly
      • launch early and often is the mantra of web companies
      • it IS a fundamental structural differences that sets web companies apart from packaged software
      • However the old adage of "you can only launch once" still applies

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